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07:27 | 25th April 2017

Lifestyle: Coming Out

Fri 9 Jul, 2010
By Sam Bristowe


If someone is voicing suicidal thoughts or intentions, they must be taken seriously. Offer to listen as he vents his feelings of despair, anger and loneliness. Sometimes this is enough to lighten the load

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Acceptance

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PInkwire saw an alarming letter in The Mirror's 'Dear Miriam' segment about a young boy struggling to find acceptance from his parents and could be contemplating suicide. If anyone is having similar troubles please be assured that there are people you can speak to.
See the details below. Someone will always listen.



It read:

Dear Miriam,

My cousin, who is my best friend, has talked about killing himself as his parents won't accept he's gay.
He came out to them two months ago and his dad, especially, has given him a rough time saying he wished he'd never been born. He's had to promise not to tell anyone else he's gay.

He's 20 and I've known about his sexuality for a long time. It doesn't bother me but I tried to warn him to keep quiet because his dad has always been bigoted. My cousin's so depressed and I don't want him to hurt himself. What should I do?
Laura

The response was as follows:

Dear Laura,

His parents are treating their son in a brutal, grotesque way. They may imagine being nasty will force him into being straight as they don't understand what it is to be gay - but they should be ashamed of themselves.

If someone is voicing suicidal thoughts or intentions, they must be taken seriously. Offer to listen as he vents his feelings of despair, anger and loneliness. Sometimes this is enough to lighten the load.

Call HopeLineUK on 0800 068 4141, a helpline for people under 35 who are depressed and struggling to cope, and their worried friends and families. Also encourage him to contact his nearest Lesbian & Gay Switchboard helpline

 

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