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03:36 | 24th June 2017

News: World

Tue 1 Nov, 2011
By Newsdesk


Human rights should be respected,

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Uganda fury at David Cameron aid threat over gay rights

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Human rights should be respected, David Cameron says

The UK is showing a "bullying mentality" by threatening to cut aid to countries where homosexuality is illegal, a Ugandan official says.
UK Prime Minister David Cameron said at the weekend that those receiving British aid should respect gay rights.

But Ugandan presidential adviser John Nagenda told the BBC Ugandans were "tired of these lectures" and should not be treated like "children".

Homosexual acts are illegal in Uganda and most other African countries.Many people see it as violating religious and cultural beliefs.



In Nigeria, the government has unveiled a draft law which makes it an offence for anyone to support gay marriages.

Mr Cameron told the BBC he had raised the issue of gay rights at the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting, in Perth, Australia, last week.

Mr Cameron said those receiving UK aid should "adhere to proper human rights".
Ending the bans on homosexuality was one of the recommendations of an internal report into the future relevance of the Commonwealth.

Mr Nagenda accused Mr Cameron of showing an "ex-colonial mentality" and of treating Ugandans "like children".
"Uganda is, if you remember, a sovereign state and we are tired of being given these lectures by people," he told the BBC's Newshour programme. "If they must take their money, so be it."

Mr Cameron's threat applies only to one type of bilateral aid known as general budget support, and would not reduce the overall amount of aid to any one country.

Malawi has already had some of its budget support suspended over concerns about its attitude to gay rights.

Source BBC.co.uk
Tp read more of this story see:
www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-15524013

 

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