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03:32 | 24th June 2017

News: World

Tue 14 Sep, 2010
By Sam Bristowe


It does not repeal 'don't ask don't tell' -- I wish it did, but it doesn't. It simply authorizes the ending of the policy if there's a certification that doing so will not undermine the morale of our troops

Latest Headlines

Gay Soldiers shouldnt command troops say's Brazillian General.

A Brazilian general’s comment that gay soldiers should not be allowed to command troops sparked fierce criticism today from gay rights groups and a national lawyers’ organisation that champions human rights


SJP – SATC2 = LGBT

Sarah Jessica Parker has given away her tickets to the Sex and the City 2 premier in a bid to raise money for equal LGBT rights.


Five arrested in Kenya over gay wedding

Kenya police on Friday arrested five suspected homosexuals in a coastal resort town after hundreds of residents protested over a planned gay wedding, a local official said.


Prop 8 to be made into a film

Seeking to overcome a broadcast blackout imposed by the US Supreme Court, a pair of Los Angeles filmmakers have undertaken the task of faithfully recreating the federal trial on California’s same-sex marriage ban for the internet – all 60-plus hours of it; every “um,” “yes, your honour” and “objection!”


US Senate could green-light end to gay ban soon

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The US Senate could vote early next week on a bill that permits the Pentagon to end a ban on gays serving openly in the military, known as "don't ask, don't tell," a top lawmaker said Monday.

Senators will take up an annual military spending blueprint, which includes language on the 1993 policy, "at the end of this week, maybe next week," Senate Armed Services Committee chairman Carl Levin, a Democrat, told reporters.

"It does not repeal 'don't ask don't tell' -- I wish it did, but it doesn't. It simply authorizes the ending of the policy if there's a certification that doing so will not undermine the morale of our troops," said Levin.



The rule requires gay military personnel to hide their sexual orientation or face dismissal -- an approach critics charge has harmed US national security by forcing out qualified, committed troops.

With less than two months before November mid-term elections, polls show overwhelming US public support for ending the ban, but some opponents of doing so have vowed a pitched battle in the US Congress.

The US House of Representatives in May overwhelmingly approved the 2011 military authorization bill that includes a path to lift the ban, and Levin's committee narrowly approved ending the restrictions as well.

Democratic Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid could bring up the controversial measure this week, setting the stage for a key procedural vote next week, said spokesman Jim Manley.

The House-passed bill would end the ban contingent on a Pentagon review due December 1 of its likely impact on current troops.

It would also require a formal certification from top commanders that lifting the ban will not harm the military's ability to fight, amid wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

A federal judge in California last week ruled the ban was unconstitutional, placing President Barack Obama's administration in the difficult position of trying to defend a policy it is committed to repealing.

Source: AFP

 

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