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14:09 | 23rd March 2017

News: UK

Mon 2 Aug, 2010
By Sam Bristowe


Anyone who believes they have been a victim of an incident motivated by hate can have confidence in reporting it to the authorities and of receiving a professional service

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New hate crime scheme for Central Scotland

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A new scheme has been released in Scotland in a bid to tackle the issue of hate crimes towards the gay community.

Central Scotland Police have revealed that they hope to improve their current systems for reporting hate crimes and a bid to prevent as many as possible. For those unlucky enough to be a victim of a hate crime incident they hope to provide improved after care for those affected.

It wont only be the police services that aim to tackle the issue of homophobic hate crime with other emergency services, local services and councils and also educational institutions in a bit to lower the rates of homophobic abuse.



Pink Paper spoke to Central Scotland Police Chief Constable Gordon Samson, who said: “Anyone who believes they have been a victim of an incident motivated by hate can have confidence in reporting it to the authorities and of receiving a professional service.”

There is no excuse for any form of hate crime - it is intolerable. When it does happen, victims must feel they can report it and be confident that they will receive a good level of service from the police, as well as from other agencies involved.”

Earlier this year Scotland welcomed a new law that saw hate crime towards the LGBT community will now hold the same gravitas as racial hate crime and will therefore mean stricter sentences for those found guilty of homophobia.

 

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