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08:29 | 29th April 2017

News: UK

Wed 9 Jun, 2010
By Sam Bristowe


Phrases such as "a person of the other persuasion", "a woman with lesbian tendencies" and "he/she bats for the other side" should be avoided

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A new guide has been issued within Lothian and Borders Police in Scotland which is aimed to prevent their officers from using condescending language towards the public or within the workplace.

The Appropriate Language Guide has been put in place to reinforce a comfortable place of work and ensure no offensive language or phases are used in reference to gender, age, disability, ethnicity and sexual orientation.

According to the Telegraph, Bill Aitken MSP has reportedly slammed the new guide for its costing: "There are complaints about police budgets, but apparently Lothian and Borders Police seem to have the time and the money to waste on politically correct and esoteric matters. They should cut this nonsense out and have a few more officers patrolling the streets of Edinburgh."



In reference to sexual orientation the guide states that it is "direct, factual and, therefore, professional".

Adding: "Phrases such as "a person of the other persuasion", "a woman with lesbian tendencies" and "he/she bats for the other side" should be avoided."

It urges that other phrases aren’t used that could be seen as patronising: "You should be aware that some people may not enjoy being referred to as "one of the boys" or "one of the girls. In a similar way, you need to be aware that terms such as "dear", "pet", or "love" can be devaluing and patronising, particularly when used by older staff towards younger staff. They are best avoided."

Director of Stonewall Scotland, Carl Watt, reportedly praised the new guide: "Lothian and Borders Police have a track record of working to build trust with the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community and making great efforts to ensure everybody is treated equally and fairly."

 

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