Newsletter


Email:

Name:

14:36 | 24th July 2017

News: UK

Wed 8 Sep, 2010
By Sam Bristowe


My advice is no matter how small you think your problem is, speak to somebody about it

Latest Headlines

Exclusive – Angela Eagle MP praises first ever LGBT History Month Magazine

Exclusive – Angela Eagle MP praises first ever LGBT History Month Magazine

The UKs first ever LGBT History Month magazine is being launched with the support of Angela Eagle


EasyJet offers free flight to Pope (Plus Speedy Boarding)

Budget airline EasyJet yesterday offered to fly Pope Benedict XVI to the UK following the recent controversy surrounding his viewpoints on British Equality laws and estimated cost of his visit.


Anger of The Sun gay minister survey

The Sun has caused havoc after publishing a poll yesterday asking whether gay people should be allowed to be cabinet ministers.


Harman confirms discrimination law bid dropped

The Government will not push through proposals that churches argue would restrict their ability to deny jobs to gay people and transsexuals, Equality Minister Harriet Harman has confirmed.


Campaign to tackle suicide in young men

  • Send aticle to a friend
  • Send your Comments

Welsh International Rugby Union referee Nigel Owens urged men to talk about their problems as he helped launch a campaign against suicide amongst men.

The 39-year-old star who came out publicly as gay three years ago, said he had been lucky to have had a "second chance" after attempting suicide by taking an overdose in his 20s.

He urged men to "pick up the phone" and speak about their problems - no matter how small - as he backed the Samaritans Men on the Ropes campaign.

"I was lucky enough to get a second chance and realise that I had a problem and how much it helped when I did speak to people about it," he said.



"My advice is no matter how small you think your problem is, speak to somebody about it."

Owens, who revealed his life story in his autobiography Half Time, suffered from bulimia and depression after realising he was gay when he was 19 years old. He fell into a coma after attempting suicide aged 26.

"I woke up in hospital, my parents were crying and all my friends were there. 'My God, what have I done?' were the first thoughts to cross my mind," he said.

"I needed to accept who I was and once I did that I could get on with things."

The star joined a launch at Waterloo station in London for the campaign aimed at reducing the toll of more than 4,000 male suicides a year in the UK.

The campaign, targeted at working class men in their 30s, 40s and 50s also aims to cut suicides on the railways and has the backing of Network Rail.

Source: UKPA

 

Back to previous page